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Curry spice and everything nice!

Curry spice and everything nice!

When I got the opportunity to work with a local independent Indian restaurant, Dabbawalla Indian Kitchen, I was delighted!! This Indian dining experience has been inspired by the lively Indian street food scene, with sustainability at its core – “Dabbawala’s” constitute a lunchbox delivery and return system that delivers hot lunches from homes and restaurants to people at work in India, especially in
Mumbai.
With our values aligned, I couldn’t wait to get started. It really is one of a kind!
Due to current COVID-19 restrictions the restaurant is currently only open for takeaway, which means food photography and visual content is of top priority, to show off their modern and exciting approach to traditional Indian cuisine!
For me, food photography is an opportunity to tell a story. In this case, to show off Dabbwalla’s vision, drawing on traditional dishes with a modern twist. It is always important for me to collaborate with my clients, to ask the right questions and capture this beautiful, stylish new restaurant in the best way I can.

The Brief: To capture Dabbawalla’s menu of over 30 dishes…WOW, my mind was racing with creativity. How many images do they require? Are they planning to do all the dishes or the most popular? What does the restaurant look like? Will I have props available, garnishes, chopped herbs, spices? Are there any time constraints? What type of backgrounds are available? Are there any ‘must have’ priority shots required? What is the purpose of the shoot – website, menu, app, social media?
Food photography can be very subjective, much like interiors and fashion. At this point it is important for me to be able to speak to the client, arrange a consultation & preferably take a visit to the restaurant, so I can immerse myself into the mind of the client and the audience that will be engaged by the photography I deliver.

Our visual culture has rapidly developed. Online consumers can only remember 10-20% of the information they read. When you add imagery or other visual content, that number goes up to 65%.

It doesn’t matter how great the recipe is, if the image doesn’t pull the viewer in, it is difficult to stand out. Restaurants now need to spend time creating images that will “sell” their recipes to their viewers.
There are many components to making an image look appetising, mouthwatering, natural.
Composition is key, whilst making the image appear as a true representation of the dish you will consume.
The day was a success! From the early morning aroma of the food filling the restaurant, setting up, styling & lighting, to the compositions and photography.
The Result: a library of content for multi-purpose use across marketing platforms both print and digital.
My inspiration came from capturing the authentic, vibrant splendour of whole ingredients of each dish that was delivered to the camera.

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